Windows 7- Virtual Keyboard Instructions

There are 3 steps needed to load virtual keyboards and type in the desired language

Step 1: Activate the language and keyboard in the system. This is explained further below for each language
Step 2: Switch to the desired language
Step 3: Type in the desired language

 

Step 1: Activate Language & Keyboard

  • Start Menu > Control Panel > Region and Language
writing-input-guide-windows-control-panel.png
 
  • Select the Keyboards and Languages tab and click on the Change keyboards... button
writing-input-guide-windows-keyboards-and-languages.png
 
  • Click the Add... button to bring up the list of languages
writing-input-guide-change-keyboards.png
 
  • Click the + sign next to the desired language you want to activate. Then check the checkbox for the input method under the keyboard dropdown. Please see further details below
 

 

Step 2: Switch to the desired keyboard

  • Language Bar: Use the Language Bar to switch between the language keybaords in Windows. There are a few options you can play with for how to use the Language Bar. To view options go to Start Menu > Control Panel > Region and Language. Click on Change keyboards... and select the Language Bar tab.
writing-input-guide-windows-language-bar-tab.png
writing-input-guide-windows-language-bar.png
  • The left Alt key + Shift will cycle through the activated language keyboards.

 

Step 3: Type in the Desired Language

  • After switching to the desired keyboard begin typing in the target language.
  • On-Screen Keyboard: Using the On-Screen Keyboard is not required, but may be helpful for test takers typing in a character-based language. Test takers can click the keys on the On-Screen Keyboard, or use it as a keyboard layout reference when typing on the physical keyboard.
Windows_7_OnScreen_Keyboard.PNG
 
  • To turn on the On-Screen Keyboard click on the Start menu and type "OSK" in the "Search programs and files" field..
  • IMPORTANT: To setup an On-Screen Keyboard for test takers, go into the options and uncheck "Use Text Prediction" as shown in the images below to ensure the On-Screen Keyboard is not aiding test takers with their writing.
Turn_Off_Text_Prediction.PNG
 
  • Once the On-Screen Keyboard is turned on, switching a language in the Language Bar will make it show up on the On-Screen Keyboard.
writing-input-guide-windows-OSK-animated-2.gif

Language Specific Instructions

Arabic

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Arabic (Saudi Arabia) and then under Keyboard check Arabic (101)
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Arabic
  • Step 3: Type in Arabic
    • Responses need to be typed in Modern Standard Arabic
arabic-saudi-arabia-arabic-101-keyboard-layout-2.png
 
 

Armenian

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Armenian (Armenia) and then under Keyboard check Armenian Eastern

writing-input-guide-windows7-load-armenian-2.png
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Armenian
  • Step 3: Type in Armenian
writing-input-guide-windows7-armenian-armenia-armenian-eastern-keyboard-layout.png
 
 

Chinese simplified

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Chinese (Simplified, PRC) and then under Keyboard check Chinese (Simplified) - Microsoft Pinyin ABC Input Style
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Chinese Simplified
    • After selecting the Chinese Simplified keyboard, adjust the input style in the same area to Microsoft Pinyin ABC Input Style. At this point there is also a Chinese/English switch key which defaults to the Shift key. The test taker may need to hit the Shift key to start typing in Pinyin
  • Step 3: Type in Chinese Simplified
    • Typing in Chinese Simplified begins with typing the pronunciation of the word with letters from the English alphabet and then hitting the space bar to bring up a list of Chinese Simplified characters to choose
 

Note: There is no keyboard layout for for the Chinese (Simplified, PRC) - Microsoft Pinyin ABC Input Style keyboard layout because phrases are spelled out with letters from the English Alphabet

 

Chinese Traditional

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Chinese (Traditional, Taiwan) and then under Keyboard check Chinese (Traditional) - New Phonetic

writing-input-guide-windows-chinese-traditional.png
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Chinese Traditional
    • After selecting the Chinese Traditional keyboard, adjust the input style in the same area to Chinese (Traditional) - New Phonetic. At this point there is also a Chinese/English switch key which defaults to the Shift key. The test taker may need to hit the Shift key to start typing in Chinese Traditional
  • Step 3: Type in Chinese Traditional
    • Typing in Chinese Traditional begins with typing the pronunciation of the word with letters from the English alphabet, and then hitting the space bar to bring up a list of Chinese Traditional characters to choose
writing-input-guide-windows-typing-in-chinese-traditional.png
 

Note: There is no keyboard layout for for the Chinese (Traditional, Taiwan) - New Phonetic keyboard layout because phrases are spelled out with letters from the English Alphabet

 

Haitian Creole

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for English (United States) and then under Keyboard check United States - International

 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to United States - International
  • Step 3: Type in Haitian Creole
    • Haitian Creole only uses one accent mark - the grave accent mark
    • To type Haitian Creole accent marks click ' (~ key) then type the letter ae, or o to produce àèò. For capital letters hold shift when typing the letter to produce ÀÈÒ
 

Hebrew

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Hebrew (Israel) and then under Keyboard check Hebrew

 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Hebrew
  • Step 3: Type in Hebrew
hebrewisrael-hebrew-keyboard-layout-2.png
 
 

Hindi

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Hindi (India) and then under Keyboard check Hindi Traditional
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Hindi
  • Step 3: Type in Hindi
 
 

Japanese

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Japanese (Japan) and then under Keyboard check Microsoft IME

 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Japanese
    • After selecting the Japanese Keyboard, adjust the input mode in the same area as Microsoft IME and change the input mode to Hiragana, Full-width Katakana, or Half-width Katakana
  • Step 3: Type in Japanese
    • Typing in Japanese begins with typing the pronunciation of the word with letters from the English alphabet, and then hitting space bar to bring up a list of Japanese characters to choose
writing-input-guide-windows-typing-in-japanese.png
 

Note: There is no keyboard layout for for the Japanese (Japan) - Microsoft IME keyboard layout because phrases are spelled out with letters from the English Alphabet

 

Korean

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Korean (Korea) and then under Keyboard check Microsoft IME

 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Korean
  • Step 3: Type in Korean
 
 

Polish

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Polish (Poland) and then under Keyboard check Polish (Programmers)
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Polish (Programmers)
  • Step 3: Type in Polish
writing-input-guide-windows7-polish-poland-polish-programmers-keyboard-layout.png
 
 

Russian

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Russian (Russia) and then under Keyboard check Russian
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Russian
  • Step 3: Type in Russian
russia-russian-russia-keyboard-layout-2.png
 
 

Samoan

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Maori (New Zealand) and then under Keyboard check Maori
writing-input-guide-windows7-samoan.png
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Maori
  • Step 3: Type in Samoan
    • To type Samoan accent marks click ' (~ key) then type the letter aeio, or u to produce āēīōū. For capital letters hold shift when typing the letter to produce ĀĒĪŌŪ
 

Tamil

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Tamil (India) and then under Keyboard check Tamil
writing-input-guide-windows7-load-tamil.png
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Tamil
  • Step 3: Type in Tamil
 
 

Vietnamese

  • Step 1: Click the + sign for Vietnamese (Vietnam) and then under Keyboard check Vietnamese
 
  • Step 2: Switch the keyboard to Vietnamese
  • Step 3: Type in Vietnamese
 
Updated August 2018